CHINA 18

Chen Kegui



Chen Kegui was released on July 29, 2015. At this time he continues to suffer stomach pains but has been denied medical treatment because he “doesn’t not posses the residency permit that was moved with him when he was imprisoned,” according to Freedom Now. When the Chinese government releases his residency permit to him, Chen Kegui will be able to seek medical attention at a local hospital.

Background:

Chen Kegui, nephew of prominent rights defender and blind legal activist Chen Guangcheng, served a three-year, three-month prison sentence for assault in a case related to the older Chen’s escape from illegal house arrest.

For many years, Chen Kegui and many other members of Chen Guangcheng’s family have been under government surveillance and been threatened simply because they are related to Chen Guangcheng.

On the night of April 27, 2012, more than 10 government officials searching for escapee Chen Guangcheng climbed over the wall of Chen Kegui’s home, forced their way inside, ransacked Chen’s home and beat him and other family members. Chen used a kitchen knife to defend himself.

Chen was subsequently arrested and was convicted on Dec. 3, 2012 of “intentionally inflicting harm.”

While in detention awaiting trial, Chen was tortured. Furthermore, authorities wouldn’t allow Chen’s family to hire a lawyer to defend him, nor did they allow observers at the trial.
In prison, Chen has been discriminated against, placed under strict control, and been subjected to more beatings.

In April 2013, Chen had an attack of acute appendicitis, but prison officials refused to provide medical treatment. If left untreated, acute appendicitis can lead to life-threatening complications or death. Prison officials also rejected his family’s request that Chen be freed on medical parole.

Chen was born on June 10, 1979, in Shuanghou, in coastal China’s Shandong province.

(Chen Guangfu’s video testimony about his son for the European Parliament hearing concerning the China 18 can be viewed at http://www.chinaaid.org/2013/12/china-16-becomes-china-18-prisoners.html)